Sunday, February 2, 2014

Weekends with Chesterton :: Endurance



Linking up with Sarah at Amongst Lovely Things for Weekends with Chesterton.

.... in everything worth having, even in every pleasure, there is a point of pain or tedium that must be survived, so that the pleasure may revive and endure. The joy of battle comes after the first fear of death; the joy of reading Virgil comes after the bore of learning him; the glow of the sea-bather comes after the icy shock of the sea bath; and the success of the marriage comes after the failure of the honeymoon.  
From What's Wrong with the World 




5 comments:

  1. Oh! This has such beautiful implications for our children learning the hard stuff, doesn't it? And we've all experienced it when we learn something we've had to struggle through first. Thank you for choosing this one- it's very encouraging.

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    1. Yes. I can especially see this when it comes to practicing a musical instrument. I remember wanting to quit piano when I was a couple years into it, but my parents made me stick it out. I wanted nothing more than to stop because I was so bored with it and it was starting to get difficult. But when I broke through that boredom and difficulty and got to the other side the joy carried me beyond anything I had ever imagined. I am so grateful to them for making me stick with it. I hope I can have that same determination when my own kids want to quit!

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  2. Yes, very encouraging, as in, giving courage to go through those painful or tedious failures. A great selection. Thank you!

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    1. I keep thinking of how tedious prayer can be sometimes when I can't pay attention and how painful it is to see myself fail over and over again. I guess that's what repentance is all about, isn't it? Pushing through the failure and not giving up because of self-pity....

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